This site began in 1997 to promote the consumer/business bestseller Dancing With Lawyers – revised and published as a PDF Ebook in March, 2013. I added some legal articles I’d written for newspapers, and fleshed out some emails into online articles and information, linked from the left-side column.

Then the emails started pouring in with questions, mainly about slander and libel, so the webmaster bugged me to write a guide on defamation of character. That was published in 2003 as Fighting Slander (since then updated and in fourth edition). It didn’t solve the webmaster’s problem – the readers started asking for more information, so I’m now working on a couple of legal guides to doing business online, also listed in the left-side column. And then there’s a lady in the Midwest who recently talked me into writing a guide for foster parents on dealing with social workers and child protective services (CPS). More suggestions are welcome, but those three guides should keep me busy well into 2011, since readers deserve accurate information, and that takes a lot of study.

Background: I’m not a lawyer. My legal experience comes through managing lawyers in business Author photo(book and software publishing, media, real estate, manufacturing, services, etc.), writing contracts, occasional litigation, law school classes and a lot of reading, and the research I did before writing hundreds of articles and columns for newspapers, syndicates, and magazines. I’ve also done several hundred or perhaps a thousand law-related radio/TV interviews ranging from Smalltown to the BBC, led investigations into legal and corporate corruption, and acted as technical advisor in Internet-related lawsuits (when I agree with the ethics).

If you want more on how the first book was written, please see the media page.

PS. After 20 years of practicing law on my own behalf, I don’t have any qualms about writing legal guides. However, because I never took the bar exam, I can’t legally answer emails about specific legal questions. That would be the Unauthorized Practice of Law (UPL), and the bar associations would soon be complaining. No, they don’t complain about teenagers giving out legal advice in online forums – but teenagers get a free pass.